Make The Right Choices FAST Before Traveling

When you have a task or a goal, it’s important that you make the right choices fast. 

It took just under 120 days to leave our life back in the US and get to Thailand.  We could have done it in 90 days or even less if it wasn’t for the one major mistake I made with pet preparations.

I am an obsessive, analytical person that drives everyone around him crazy.  I question everything.  Whether it’s my culture, myself, or whether I should get Taco Bell, I question it.

So what I found was that I had a HUGE disadvantage when trying to plan for a 10,000 mile move from home with my girlfriend, my business, and my two pets.  In my experiences, only a few things can stop people from achieving something great; fear, time, and “being reasonable.”

Today, I want to share my story to help you manage your time.

Rewind about 90 days ago and I thought that I had it all figured out.  I committed to downsizing my recording and mixing to headphones and a laptop, I had a sweet Evernote notebook full of things I needed to do, I had prices for flights figured out, packets on visa types to read, USDA pet requirements, pet travel crates, and a dream to move to a country that I’ve never been to before.

Nothing could stop us.  Until my girlfriend asked me one question…

“So what type of travel bag are you thinking about getting?”

I hadn’t even thought of that.  I clearly will have much more stuff than the average backpacker given my industry.  I need the perfect bag.  I hadn’t even thought of this.  I didn’t think it was important.  A bag is a bag.

Or so I thought.

I spent the next 5 days researching different travel bags, measuring my equipment, selecting carrying cases for my gear, reading blog posts about bags, watching youtube videos about bags, bags, bags, bags, bags!

My brain was on overload.

Then in the midst of my rage, I remembered a chapter from Tim Ferris’ The Four Hour Work Week where he talks about attention in terms of units.  I realized that I had spent countless hours wasting away on a decision for a travel backpack when I had many other important decisions to make.

I still had a ton of things to sell, things to pack, things to plan, etc.

I realized that if I did not make decisions and make them quickly, then we would never meet our goal.  So I developed a personal system to combat decision fatigue.

If there was a decision to be made, I researched the top three recommended products or paths others took to achieve whatever it was I had to decide on.  Whether it was flights, where to sell things, a backpack, a piece of gear, to things as simple as the best microfibre travel towel.

All of these little things were eating away at my time.

So whatever the top three recommendations were, I spent fifteen minutes reading about each thing.  Then at the end, I made my final decision.  Even if it was the wrong one, the amount of time that I got back in my day to focus on moving things along quickly to make this happen was worth it.

As I pack the bag that I chose for a my third day out in Bangkok, I am proud to say that this unreachable, major goal has become a reality.

 

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